• Kindergarten Reader’s Workshop

    Welcome to Kindergarten Reader’s Workshop! We are excited to partner with you in building your child’s reading life at home and school. The skills and strategies taught throughout the unit are introduced gradually and will be developed during the entire school year. Please know that each child will travel this developmental journey at his/her own pace. 

    Unit 1: We Are Readers

    The first part of Unit 1 invites children to read non-fiction (informational) texts. The second part of the unit adds storybooks which your child will enjoy rereading and retelling.

    Skills and Strategies Taught (What it looks and sounds like!):
    • Good readers share books with others by remembering and retelling books they love.
    • Good readers read pictures and words and make meaning from page to page.
    • Good readers handle books with care and store them carefully in the right spot.
    • Good readers point under the words and pictures of the text, go from left to right, top to bottom of the page, and page to page.
    • Good readers read with others to share what they notice and talk about the details in the book. They read like story tellers using story telling voices and expressions.

    Ways to support your child at home:
    • Help your child create a book basket in which they can practice caring for their books.
    • Help your child to begin to grow stamina by having him/her stay focused on a book either by looking at pictures and/or text 
    • Find a favorite reading spot in the house.
    • Help your child to retell the story encouraging the use of expression with his/her voice.
    • Help your child to predict what might happen next.


    Unit 2: Super Powers

    In Unit Two, your child will learn about the strategies necessary to begin moving from an oral language/symbolic reader to a more conventional reader. The skills and strategies introduced in this unit will support the understanding that pictures assist in reading words. The children will learn to apply letters and their associated sounds along with high frequency words while reading a book.

    Skills and Strategies Taught (What it looks and sounds like!):
    • Good readers use the pictures and the words to give them the power to read a story.
    • Good readers point under words as they read to make sure the letters match the sounds.                                                                   • Good readers notice patterns in their books.

    Ways to support your child at home:
    • Help your child to think about the super powers he/she has to help read a book.
    • Help your child to grow stamina by having him/her stay focused on a book and reading for longer lengths of time. 
    • Help your child discover different patterns in a book and predict what the next page might say.
    • Encourage your child to reread books to develop a smooth reading voice.

     

    Unit 3: Bigger Books, Bigger Reading Muscles

    In Unit 3, children will continue to use print strategies that teach them how to approach and read a tricky word. Additionally, this unit introduces more strategies that will be useful in developing bigger reading muscles to access more challenging books.

    Skills and Strategies Taught (What it looks and sounds like!):
    • Good readers use print strategies to help to figure out the tricky words.
    • Good readers reread to rethink the tricky parts, practice with a smooth voice, and to find more details in the book.
    • Good readers use partners to coach them through the tricky words or parts of a book.

    Ways to support your child at home:
    • Help your child to tell which super power he/she is using and why.
    • Help your child to grow bigger reading muscles by continuing to increase his/her stamina and focus with a book.
    • While your child is reading, encourage your child to talk about his/her book to build comprehension. (Book talk: “I notice…I think… I wonder…”, making predictions, drawing inferences)

     

    Unit 4: Becoming Avid Readers

    In Unit 4, readers will react to books, share their reactions with others, and invent fun things to do with books and friends. The readers will connect to the characters through their actions and feelings. They will continue to use decoding strategies and practice fluency.

    Skills and Strategies Taught (What it looks and sounds like!):
    • Good readers study the facial expressions and body language to know what characters are thinking or feeling.
    • Good readers explain what they have learned to others and share that learning.
    • Good readers practice reading their books many times to build fluency and comprehension.

    Ways to support your child at home:
    • Help your child note the facial features and body language of character to determine what the character is thinking or feeling.
    • Give your child plenty of time and opportunity to read independently and with others.
    • Help your child imagine what a character might say or think in the book.
    • Encourage your child to act out the book character.